Happy Birthday Cake, Let us Eat!

VERY FANCY!

The season of celebration is upon us. Summer is here, and the living is easy….right? Birthday cake, weddings, baby showers, seemingly all require some sort of cake. In a previous thread we discussed cakes in general, history, how to’s, etc. http://www.professionalchefsfoodnetwork.org/2021/06/09/quils-mangent-de-la-brioche/. Today, I want to look at styles, theme and the obsession for cakes in general.

The season of celebration is upon us. Summer is here, and the living is easy….right? Birthdays, weddings, baby showers, seemingly all require some sort of cake.

Cake Styles

Left to Right, Top to Bottom;

  • Traditional “Iced” Wedding Cake
  • Homestyle Chocolate Cake
  • Fancy Restaurant/Buffet Cake
  • Christmas Cake
  • Unique styelized Wedding Cake
  • Rolled Fondant Birthday Cake

This list could include hundreds of more themes, styles and production methods. A great link for ideas that I have been using for years; https://www.pastrywiz.com/index.html Site appears kind of dated and tacky, however the content is really good, and it’s free!

THEMES

A theme would refer to the actual event. With most events or rights of passage, there is usually a cake of some sort. This can differ a great deal, depending on the event; wedding, birthday, baby shower, stag and doe, etc. The theme can also range from very basic to very unusual…and everything in between.

MY 18TH BIRTHDAY PARTY CAKE
  • Classical; Shabby Chic, Tea Party, Bohemian
  • Animals; Farm, Forest, Ocean
  • Seasonal; Christmas, Valentines, Mothers day
  • Classic Children’s Literature; Harry Potter, Dr Seuss, Peter Pan
  • Alt Food Concepts; Ice Cream, Donuts, Seasonal Fruit
  • Alt Decor Concepts; Just about anything you can imagine

CONCLUSION

Yes, you can have your cake, and eat it to. Who said that? An early recording of the phrase is in a letter on 14 March 1538 from Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, to Thomas Cromwell, as “a man can not have his cake and eat his cake”. The phrase occurs with the clauses reversed in John Heywood‘s A dialogue Conteinyng the Nomber in Effect of All the Prouerbes in the Englishe Tongue from 1546, as “wolde you bothe eate your cake, and have your cake?” In John Davies‘s Scourge of Folly of 1611, the same order is used, as “A man cannot eat his cake and haue it stil.” Who new? The image above is not actually my 18th Birthday Cake, however I am celebrating 18 months as a sober Chef! Best 18 months of my life to date, one day at a time, I’m told. Cheers, and Happy “CAKE” Day!