How do you take your Coffee?

I rant, talk and meander on about a lot of things, mostly food. I’m going to spend a little stretch talking about some of the overlooked details of the restaurant experience. Today it’s going to be coffee, one of my favorite vices. i don’t think I’m alone on this one. So grab a cup, sit back and relax! let’s look at a little history, maybe health benefits and of course how to make the perfect cup.

HISTORY

The earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking as the modern beverage appears in modern-day Yemen from the middle of the 15th century in Sufi shrines, where coffee seeds were first roasted and brewed in a manner similar to how it is now prepared for drinking. The Yemenis procured the coffee beans from the Ethiopian Highlands via coastal Somali intermediaries, and began cultivation. By the 16th century, the drink had reached the rest of the Middle East and North Africa, later spreading to Europe.

The two most commonly grown coffee bean types are C. arabica and C. robusta. Coffee plants are cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in the equatorial regions of the Americas, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, and Africa. As of 2018, Brazil was the leading grower of coffee beans, producing 35% of the worlds total.

HEALTH EFFECTS

Here is a little list of benefits, I really see no negative consequences if consumption is within reason;

Mortality

In 2012, the National Institutes of HealthAARP Diet and Health Study found that higher coffee consumption was associated with lower risk of death, and that those who drank any coffee lived longer than those who did not.

Cardiovascular disease

Moderate coffee consumption is not a risk factor for coronary heart disease.  A 2012 meta-analysis concluded that people who drank moderate amounts of coffee had a lower rate of heart failure, with the biggest effect found for those who drank more than four cups a day.

Parkinson’s disease

Meta-analyses have consistently found that long-term coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease.[5]

Type II diabetes

In a systematic review and meta-analysis of 28 prospective observational studies, representing over one million participants, every additional cup of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumed in a day was associated, respectively, with a 9% and 6% lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Cancer

Research on the effects of coffee consumption on cancer risk generally has indicated no effect, or a slightly lower risk of cancer, particularly in the liver.

Liver disease

Increasing evidence has shown that coffee consumption is protective against the progression of liver disease to cirrhosis. This is associated with antioxidant and anti-fibrotic effects of coffee.

So, it looks like we are good to go! Lastly, I would like to make us the perfect cup of coffee. Here are my recommendations;

  • When possible grind your own beans purchased from a local roaster. Select a good quality bean ex; Kenyan AA
  • Use cold filtered water (if you don’t like drinking your home water, don’t make coffee with it)
  • Measure your coffee- use 1 tablespoons of ground coffee for every 6-8 ounces of water (usually one cup on your brewer)
  • Water temperature needs to be between 195 degrees –  205 degrees. If you boil water let it sit for 30 seconds before using it (water boils at 212 degrees which is a little too hot to brew coffee)
  • I use a French Press, or sometimes a drip machine…but never Tassimo or anything similar, terrible stuff!
  • Pour just enough water over the grounds (wet not saturated) to let them bloom (they get puffy). After 30-45 seconds continue the pour over. This will get the most flavor from your coffee.
  • Drink your freshly brewed coffee within 30 minutes of brewing. Don’t let coffee sit in a brewer all day long. Make it as you need it.

Conclusion

A good cup of Joe at your favorite restaurant may not be the highlight, but it is the last memory of your dining experience. It doesn’t fix a poor dining experience, but I often say, a good dessert and coffee might salvage the wreckage of a crappy meal. Cheers, and have a great day!